HEALTH AND FITNESS

MENTAL HEALTH (PART 3)

Mental health care and treatment

In last article, we were discussing disorders remaining are discussed below

Panic disorders

  • People with a panic disorder experience regular panic attacks, which involve sudden, overwhelming terror or a sense of imminent disaster and death.

    Phobias

  • There are different types of phobia:
  • Simple phobias: These might involve a disproportionate fear of specific objects, scenarios, or animals. A fear of spiders is a common example. Learn more about simple phobias here.
  • Social phobia: Sometimes known as social anxiety, this is a fear of being subject to the judgment of others. People with social phobia often restrict their exposure to social environments

    Agoraphobia: This term refers to a fear of situations in which getting away may be difficult, such as being in an elevator or moving a train. Many people misunderstand this phobia as a fear of being outsidePhobias are deeply personal, and doctors do not know every type. There could be thousands of phobias, and what might seem unusual to one person may be a severe problem that dominates daily life for another.

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)

  • People with OCD have obsessions and compulsions. In other words, they experience constant, stressful thoughts and a powerful urge to perform repetitive acts, such as hand washing.
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  • PTSD can occur after a person experiences or witnesses a deeply stressful or traumatic event.
  • During this type of event, the person thinks that their life or other people’s lives are in danger. They may feel afraid or that they have no control over what is happening.
  • These sensations of trauma and fear may then contribute to PTSD.


    Mood disorders

  • People may also refer to mood disorders as affective disorders or depressive disorders.
  • People with these conditions have significant changes in mood, generally involving either mania, which is a period of high energy and elation, or depression. Examples of mood disorders include:
  • Major depression: An individual with major depression experiences a constant low mood and loses interest in activities and events that they previously enjoyed. They can feel prolonged periods of sadness or extreme sadness.
  • Bipolar disorder: A person with bipolar disorder experiences unusual changesTrusted Source in their mood, energy levels, levels of activity, and ability to continue with daily life. Periods of high mood are known as manic phases, while depressive phases bring on low mood. Read more about the different types of bipolar here.
  • Seasonal affective disorder (SAD): Reduced daylight triggers during the fall, winter, and early spring months trigger this type of major depression trusted Source. It is most common in countries far from the equator. Schizophrenia disorders
  • Mental health authorities are still trying to determine whether schizophrenia is a single disorder or a group of related illnesses. It is a highly complex condition.
  • Signs of schizophrenia typically develop between the ages of 16 and 30 years trusted Source, according to the NIMH. The individual will have thoughts that appear fragmented, and they may also find it hard to process information.

Schizophrenia has negative and positive symptoms. Positive symptoms include delusions, thought disorders, and hallucinations. Negative symptoms include withdrawal, lack of motivation, and a flat or inappropriate mood.